Thursday, November 20, 2008

Vegetable update (on the very pathetic side)

My contributions to Garden Blogger's Vegetable Update are always minimal because I don't have a vegetable garden (or, as we like to call it, a deer diner). But plummeting temperatures this week took out the few offerings I had. My little cowhorn pepper, despite being sheltered by the house, crumpled in the cold:


I'll be able to ripen these last few peppers, but I'm afraid the plant will have to go to the compost heap. And the last brown turkey figs didn't get a chance to ripen.


The birds' vegetable gardens, however, are doing fine. Best-in-show right now are the Pyracantha coccinea, especially the one with the western exposure, which is covered in berries.


Even the herbs are feeling too straggly to have their pictures made--unless I decide to grow some inside this winter, my next updates will have to be more bird food.

Thanks to Tina, Skeeter and Dawn at In the Garden--check out their site to see what's growing in other vegetable gardens. And, umm, happy winter.

22 comments:

Gail said...

Cosmo,

Hi and good morning! This has nothing to do with veggies, but I wanted to let you know that you can grow Hardy Cyclamen in clay soil. I promise!

Drainage is the real issue. Plant it under a tree in the midst of the roots...the tree will help keep it dry! Also don't plant too deeply; barely cover the soil! You'll know it's happy when the mottled leaves pop up! Good luck.

Happy winter top you, too!

Gail

tina said...

I see peppers there:) All edibles count as to growing food. A neat part of the garden. Yes, the cold has gotten so much lately. Did the turkey figs not ripen because of it taking longer than the other fig tree? I was looking at them in the store one day and saw this cultivar. Thought of your figs.

I agree with Gail on the cyclamen. I have mine growing in a bad area, under a tree and it does fine. A neat plant. The trick is to get the right kind. ttyl

Cameron (Defining Your Home) said...

Cosmo -- I empathize with you. I don't have a "deer diner" either. At least we can grow herbs and foods for the birds!

Cameron

walk2write said...

Don't be ashamed to show those herbs! They deserve their moment of glory too. I haven't seen a fig tree since we left Florida. Our neighbor grew them, and a friend of ours also kept us supplied with her surplus. They are prolific bearers. Not really sure what the varieties are. Today, I captured (on camera) a deer in the yard of our new place, so I think any veggies I plant next year will have to be happy in pots on the deck or otherwise close to the house. The squirrels here seem pretty fearless too. Thanks for visiting the other day. Sorry it took me so long to get here!

perennialgardener said...

The cold got to what was left of my tender perennials this week too. Thanks for stopping by today, I'm still not feeling myself so I took a break today from blogging. :)

Cosmo said...

Hi, Gail--Thanks for the advice--I love the pictures you and Entangled posted of the cyclamen, so I'm glad to get some guidance about where to plant it (and wouldn't you know, I'm looking for something to plant under trees)--thanks so much! Have your deer returned, btw? Liquid Fence is fabulous, but I don't like to use it on things I'm going to eat . . .

Tina--Your gardens are an inspiration--I don't know where you find the energy. We had tons of turkey figs--the tree just keeps putting out more and more until the cold drives it into dormancy, so the ones I showed were the last gasps. But yes, it produces much later than the Celeste--that one was done about a month ago.

With any luck, I'll be posting cyclamen pictures next summer!

Cosmo said...

Cameron--Yeah, there's less and less room on my deck each summer--I do miss fresh tomatoes, though.

Hi, W2W--I'm glad you stopped by, though I'm afraid it was for one of my lamer displays! Most of the herbs will sputter through the winter, though I did chop the culinary sage. Figs are iffy here--mine are in my "micro-climate" spots and have done well for three years. But I know people in colder climates who grow smaller trees that they wheel inside every winter. It must be an adventure moving from Zone 9 to--what? 6?

Cosmo said...

Raquel--Keep drinking that hot cocoa--I'm sorry to hear that you're still feeling badly. I'm watching plant after plant go to sleep for the winter--but just as well, because I'm more and more inclined toward dormancy, too. Hope you're better soon.

Gail said...

Cosmo...So far they have stayed away but then I might be missing them!
They are clever opportunists!

Gail

Rose said...

Cosmo, Like you, my veggie photos have been minimal this year. I was going to join in today...but haven't had time to get it together yet, although it's more a lament about the garden past than anything growing now.

Looks like you have lots of fruit for the birds, though--I think that should certainly count!

Cindy said...

Cosmo ~ how cool that you have a fig tree. I'm sorry they last ones didn't get a chance to ripen. Nice to see some bright food for the birds though!

Roses and Lilacs said...

The pyracantha is beautiful. I remember the one I had when I lived in Alabama. I loved it.
Marnie

Cherb said...

I think your pyracantha is wonderful! I would love to plant them here.

Skeeter said...

Gosh you have lots of berrys on your bush! Our bush does not produce that many but maybe due to lack of sun. Saint wants to cut it down but I will not let him. He says it scratches him when he mows. Ha, he mows all of about 3 times per year as I do most of the mowing..

Thanks For 2 Day said...

Hi Cosmo,
It's that time of year...yep, even the veggies have to take a rest! You really show a variety of things remaining, however. I have no veggies, other than 4 tomato plants that I grew this summer. They were in pots on my deck and did fairly well. I have a photo somewhere...perhaps i'll post it later this winter when i'm trying to come up with photos for my blog!

My daughter is in college in NN, VA...don't want to give too much info. here...but how far is that from James City Co? I'm familiar only with Norfolk and North of there.

Take care! Jan

ConsciousGardener said...

My veggies are worse than that! Good job:) We have had one of the dryest summers on record and everytime I see a beautiful veggie garden I think...I wonder what their water bill looks like?

Praying for rain...

Cosmo said...

Hi, Rose--I do miss fresh tomatoes--I might try some patio pots next year. But growing for the birds is fun, too (and those last little figs won't go to waste).

Hi, Cindy--I love our fig trees. The really great thing about them is that they draw honey bees--the trees are so prolific that I have plenty to share with the birds and bees, who don't seem to mind them even after the frost nips them!

Cosmo said...

Hi, Marnie--Pyracantha are everywhere here, so much so that we take them for granted--until we need some winter color, that is!

Cherb--Where are you from? Do you have a blog? I guess I thought you might be from the Southwest since you identified that flower for me (thanks again)--I know they grow in the Phoenix area (though the berries ferment in the sun, which isn't so good for the birds . . .)

Skeeter--Yeah, the bush is pretty thorny--ours are against the house walls to they don't present too much problem with mowing--but tacking them up can be painful!

Cosmo said...

Hi, Thanks42day--Your daughter's college is about 40 minutes from where I live, but I'm guessing very close to Racquel. I live just NW of Williamsburg (or SE of Richmond) if that helps . . .

Jeff said...

Hi Cosmo-

It's great to hear from you. Miss communicating with you more regularly, but life has gotten in the way for the moment. Bet those peppers are really not happy after tonight!

Have to second the advice on cyclamen - my clay is as heavy as it comes, but if you build a shallow raised bed under a tree, they'll do great, especially hederifolium. I have that variety in white and pink with lots of foliar variation after years of collecting, and it sows itself all over the garden. Coum, cilicium, graecum, pseudibericum, and purpurascens are a little more demanding of good drainage, but all seem happy here once they find a location they like. Not much else grows as successfully in deep, dry shade - lots of mine are under a massive magnolia!

TC said...

"Happy winter??" Umm, hardly. ;~)

Skeeter said...

Just wanted to jump over here and wish you and your family a Happy Thanksgiving!

I'll be back next week...